And Then There Was One
1658
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-1658,single-format-standard,bridge-core-2.7.2,qode-page-transition-enabled,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,qode-theme-ver-25.9,qode-theme-bridge,disabled_footer_top,disabled_footer_bottom,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.6.0,vc_responsive

And Then There Was One

And Then There Was One

And Then There Was One

At 1900 local 20 Apr, 0900 UTC we passed under South East Cape, Tasmania. That would be 4 out of 5, leaving but one more: South Cape, New Zealand. We should be there in 8 days or less.

It hardly seems real. Whereas it has taken months to get for one to the other for the first three, the last two, knock on wood, will be passed in a  matter of weeks. That’s hardly enough time to warm up to them, let alone have it soak in.

They are also getting harder. Today we we’re reaching in gale force winds buffeted by a short, steep, and confused cross sea that had land is close written all over it. Gusts in the hard driven rain topped out at 42 knots. Let’s just say it wasn’t shorts weather.

As a boy, Tasmania seemed to be the end of the earth. A wild place uninhabited. Home of the Tasmanian Devil and little else. Where these ideas came from I do not know. Curiously however, they have stuck. It seems I cannot be any further from home than Tasmania. And now passed, it feels as if I am starting all over again with almost all the world to sail over before home.

I am pulled back to the now by the immediate problem. The thing that must be done now. The immediate problem is my secret weapon. The one thing I know that absolutely guarantees that I am moving forward and not languishing. The immediate problem now is getting as far north and away from the low that is coming on the 21st and 22nd.

As I said, they are not getting easier.

Follow my tracks in real-time:
https://bit.ly/svseaburban